katrina quisumbing king (surname: quisumbing king, pronounced kiss-uhm-bing king)* is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests center on race and ethnicity, migration and citizenship, state-making, law and society, and theory. She studies racial classification and exclusion from a historical perspective that foregrounds the state’s authority to manage populations. She is particularly interested in the ways state actors conceive of and make decisions around race and citizenship. Her research recenters empire as a key political formation. In the U.S. context, she focuses especially on how the state defines colonized populations and how these people fit into the U.S. racial order.

In her dissertation, she studies how, by defining the Philippines and Filipinos ambiguously, the United States made and broke promises to its colonial subjects. Her dissertation research has been supported by a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, an MIT School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Diversity Predoctoral Fellowship, a Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship in Tagalog, the Harry S. Truman Library Institute, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Institute.

 

 

 

*note: I do not capitalize my name, but it doesn't bother me if you do.